Hacktoberfest 2020: It is this hacking time of the year again!

It is time again for Hacktoberfest and we already took part in it with our projects and and in related projects. We will hack together, finish stuff for the GSOC projects and even some of us will take part in the virtual NASA SpaceApps Challenge. All of these open source projects can use your help. So you will do something good and also earn a brand new, limited hacktoberfest shirt!

„Hacktoberfest 2020: It is this hacking time of the year again!“ weiterlesen

Call for Google Summer of Code 2020! Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects

Again for the 6th time, AerospaceResearch.net[0] is proud to be selected as an official mentoring organization for the Summer of Code 2020 (GSOC) program run by Google[1].
And we are now looking for students to spend their summers coding on great open-source space software, getting paid up to 6600 USD by Google, releasing scientific papers about their projects and supporting the open-source space community.

Until 31. March 2020, students can apply for an hands on experience with applied space programs. As an umbrella organisation, AerospaceResearch.net, KSat-Stuttgart e.V. and ep2lab of Carlos III University of Madrid are offering you various coding ideas[2] to work on:

  • The Distributed Ground Station Network – global tracking and communication with small-satellites[2][4]
  • KSat-Stuttgart – the small satellite society at the Institute of Space Systems / University of Stuttgart[2]
  • ep2lab of Carlos III University of Madrid[2]
  • or your very own proposal![2]

If you are a student, take your giant leap into the space community, realizing your very own space software, and the chance to be recognized by Google headhunters.
If you are professor, feel free to propose this great opportunity to your students or even have your projects being coded and realized!

„Call for Google Summer of Code 2020! Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects“ weiterlesen

Hacktoberfest 2019: It is the hacking time of the year again!

It is time again for Hacktoberfest and we already took part in it with our projects and earned our free t-shirt already. We will hack together on our projects, finish stuff for the GSOC projects and some of th team will be in the US for the International Astronautical Congress (IAC2019) in Washinton DC. And even there, we will take part in NASA SpaceAppsDC and will collaboratively work on open-source projects and creat pull-requests earning us fame, respect and a new Tee.

The goal Hacktoberfest was and still is that everyone create at least 4 pull-requests by adding new features or fixing bugs to the software projects and earning a free and limited edition t-shirt by doing so. Hacktoberfest is from 1st to 31st of October 2019.

The hackathon was great, but the Hacktoberfest is still not over. You can start coding your improvements to your own or other people’s projects right now and we would be more than happy if we see your pull-request popping up on our github repository!

Start earning your hacktoberfest shirt today, and never stop coding for open-source software!

Hacktoberfest Shirt 2015
Hacktoberfest Shirt 2015

An open-source program’s Call for Help: Coordinated team-up observation for StarLink and NOAA satellites in July. Contribute to the satellite observing community 2019-07-19 until 2019-07-21!

Dear SatObs/SeeSat-L community,

We are students, taking part in Google Summer of Code 2019, and we seek your help!

We are working on an open-source project called OrbitDeterminator [w] that aims to determine the orbital parameters of satellites based on your positional data in various formats. Currently, we prepared the software so far and our next step is to test it to see how accurately it can determine satellite orbits So we would like to ask for your help in a few points to test our code under real-life conditions and your use-cases.

Our Aim, tackling StarLink and NOAAs together

We would like to tackle data of special interest for us and you, namely the StarLink satellite train and NOAA satellites. With the much talked-about StarLink observation data we can hopefully help the community to get an additional set of improved TLEs. And NOAAs are interesting for us because the TLEs are already available and we will be able to compare our results with existing TLEs.
So it would be great if you could provide us with observational positional data produced by positional observers on SatObs in IOD, UK and RDE formats. And in case there are none available yet, we would be more than happy to organize a small “global” observation campaign within the next month.

With this call-for-help, we suggest the 19th to 21st of July for us all to hunt the StarLink and NOAA satellites (more info in the information box below)

Overall Aim

With your help, we will provide you with a tool that is freely available, is easy to use and produces accurate results and benefits the satellite observing community. This information and data that you will provide will give more purpose to our code, where as we will try our best to give meaning to your data.

It would be our pleasure to end our Google Summer of Code project with this “field testing”, bringing our OrbitDeterminator package to good use within the SatObs community, and reporting our test speculations as a technical paper for the next International Aeronautical Congress 2019 call for papers in Washington DC.

Below you will find our initial line of thoughts and we are open to all discussions that will promote improvements in the same.

So who would be kind enough to answer our “call for help”? Feel free to answer on the mailing list or contact [m] us directly. We are looking forward to your positive reply!

Best regards,

Krishna, Rakshit & Vidhan (GSoC students)
Nilesh, Arya & Aakash (GSoC mentors)

m: gsoc2019@aerospaceresearch.net
c: https://aerospaceresearch.zulipchat.com/#narrow/stream/147024-OrbitDeterminator
w: https://github.com/aerospaceresearch/orbitdeterminator

Here are the areas where we need you and you people can help us:

Coordinating the Field Test:

  • Proposed Time-Span until third week of July 2019
  • Coordinated measurements during 48hours
  • We suggest to team up during 2019-07-19 18:00 UTC until 2019-07-21 18:00 UTC
  • Team-up together or single people. We organize via this SatObs Mailinglist!
  • As many single measurements as possible send via the SatObs mailing list for EVERYONE, not just us.
  • Deliverables by us: new code to OrbitDeterminator and also the results (under public domain licence)

Questions:

  1. Since a lot of data that is reported in the mailing list does not contain detailed location information about the observer, we would like the location of all observers ordered by site/station number that contains: [site/station number, observer code, observer name, latitude, longitude, elevation, active/inactive, preferred reporting format].
  2. Since all data is reported with an intrinsic measurement uncertainty, there will be some degree of error in the determined orbits as well. Can you please specify the what a typical accepted margin of error is for you?
  3. We currently produce the 7 keplerian elements and 3D orbit plots as output, in a specified format using a command line user interface. Do you people have any other preferences regarding the user interface, input options, file extensions and the output format?
  4. Can you provide the historical data for some satellites in all 3 (UK, IOD, RDE) formats? It will help us test our code and remove possible errors and exceptions.
  5. We are very much interested in the Starlink satellite train. Would you please provide us with current observations for the same?
  6. We would like to compare NOAA satellite orbits as well. But we could not find a lot of reports on the mailing list regarding the same. Could you provide some?
  7. Lastly, can you provide some reports with the results already known? This will help us compare our results with the expected results and improve our algorithms accordingly.

If we will get more questions during our discussion on the mailinglist, we will send it to the ML. And if we need to share some data, we can use this google drive folder.
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/17K1yleBHyZw_c_vOYpbwx5IJRmoQfz2i?usp=sharing

PS: I am forwarding this email on behalf of the GSOC students. They subsribed a few weeks ago and just received the „Your subscription request has been forwarded to the list administrator at seesat-l-owner@satobs.org for review.“ notice and no further confirmation. Would you please be so kind and subscribe them to the list? It will make conversion much easier for them.

Call for ESA Summer of Code in Space 2019! Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects (stipends of up to 4000€)

this summer will purely be a summer of code! We are not only offering you Google Summer of Code (GSOC 2019, still open until April 9th), but also the European Space Agency’s Summer of Code in Space 2019 (ESA SOCIS).

Now it is up to you to decide if you want to code open-source space with us during ESA Summer of Code in space 2019? You should!
Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects. You get stipends of up to 4000€. The Call for ESA SOCIS 2019 is now open!

Together, we as AerospaceResearch.net, Ksat-Stuttgart (University of Stuttgart) and EP2Lab (Carlos III University of Madrid) are proud to be selected as official mentoring organizations for the ESA Summer of Code in Space 2019.
And we are now looking for students to spend their summers coding on great open-source space software, getting paid by ESA, releasing scientific papers about their projects and supporting the open-source space community by useful programmes.
Are you a student? You have time until May 4, 2019, to apply for various coding ideas to work on, and be part of out team!

More information and registration here.

ESA Summer of Code in Space

ESA Summer of Code in Space (SOCIS) is a program run by the European Space Agency that focuses on bringing student developers into open source software development for space applications. Students work with a mentoring organization on a 3 month programming project during their summer break.

Through SOCIS, accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor or mentors from the participating organizations and with experts from ESA (where available), thus gaining exposure to open source software development and insights from ESA. In turn, the participating organizations are able to prototype new open source projects and possibly bring in new developers to work on relevant topics for space.

SOCIS is inspired by (but not affiliated or related in any way to) Google’s Summer of Code initiative, and is designed with the following objectives in mind:

  • raise the awareness of open source projects related to space, especially among students;
  • raise awareness of ESA within the open source community;
  • improve existing space-related open source software.

For further information, please chat with us on https://aerospaceresearch.zulipchat.com

Call for Google Summer of Code 2019! Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects (stipends of up to $6600)

Again for the 5th time, AerospaceResearch.net[0] is proud to be selected as an official mentoring organization for the Summer of Code 2019 (GSOC) program run by Google[1].
And we are now looking for students to spend their summers coding on great open-source space software, getting paid up to 6600 USD by Google, releasing scientific papers about their projects and supporting the open-source space community.

Until 9. April 2019, students can apply for an hands on experience with applied space programs. As an umbrella organisation, AerospaceResearch.net, KSat-Stuttgart e.V. and ep2lab of Carlos III University of Madrid are offering you various coding ideas[2] to work on:

  • The Distributed Ground Station Network – global tracking and communication with small-satellites[2][4]
  • KSat-Stuttgart – the small satellite society at the Institute of Space Systems / University of Stuttgart[2]
  • ep2lab of Carlos III University of Madrid[2]
  • or your very own proposal![2]
„Call for Google Summer of Code 2019! Be our Summer Student and code your open-source space projects (stipends of up to $6600)“ weiterlesen

We have a ZulipChat now. Join us there!

During the Google Summer of Code 2018 Mentors Summit, many projects used the open-source Zulip Chat for discussing their projects and planning their next steps.

It is a fine little chat in the spirit of Slack, but fully open-source.

We started using it for our projects and for our general discussions. So if you are looking for us, want to onboard the projects or have an idea to propose, we welcome you to join our ZulipChat channel. We are looking to meet you on

AerospaceResearch.ZulipChat.com

Space Lightning Talks! Start of the radion workshop week “FUNKWOCHE”

Our event in Jena will be special because it will be the first and currently only location that is a „Makerspace“. Makerspaces are places were people can work on creative solutions for global or private problems. And this kind of free „maker“ spirit is what will also help solve problems in space exploration. So you have the unique chance to join other creative people during the #SpaceTalks and also to take part in a full week of workshops. Because #SpaceTalks will initiate the FunkWoche during which you can come here and work on everything related to communications, be it radio frequencies, lasers, amateur radio,…. and also satellite communications. So we will bring #SpaceTalks to Jena under this flag of „FunkWoche 2018/2 and ESA’s European Spacetalks – space and even more radio! / FunkWoche 2018/2 und ESA’s European Spacetalks – Raumfahrt und noch mehr Funk“.

The event will take place at the Jena Hackspace, will be hybrid with Lightning Talks (short 15-20 minute talks of you!) for #SpaceTalks and as the starting event for the hamradio workshop week FunkWoche – and be on Monday, 19 November 2018, 2000hrs to 2130hrs. Talks and discussions may be in German or in English. Everyone is welcome.

Lightning Talks:

  • Intro: Satelliten Communication – what flies where and what can I do with it, and why to uwe and my build an antenna rotator?! (Working Title), Andreas
  • Status of the Distributed Ground Station Network for Tracking Cubesats, Andreas
  • (TBC) GroundStations, but safe/secure!, lowl3v3l
  • Your Space Topic, YOU!

Due to limited places, please register here or on meetup and RVSP this in your calendars! Further details tbc in the next weeks. We are inviting you to give a lightning talk. Just send us your title at contact@aerospaceresearch.net.

„Space Lightning Talks! Start of the radion workshop week “FUNKWOCHE”“ weiterlesen

FunkWoche 2018/2 und ESA’s European Spacetalks – Raumfahrt und noch mehr Funk (19.-24.11.2018 ab 19:00 Uhr, im Hackspace Jena e.V.)

Es ist wieder Zeit sich mit Funk zu beschäftigen und dieses mal mit mehr Raumfahrt.
Daher rufen wir nun die „FunkWoche 2018/2 und ESA’s European Spacetalks – Raumfahrt und noch mehr Funk“ aus.
Das Konzept ist wie letztes mal, dass wir jeden Tag in dieser Woche an Funkthemen arbeiten, reden, diskutieren, auslegen, oder anderweitig kreativ umsetzen werden. Und mit „wir“ meinen wir auch euch!. Mögliche Themen sammeln wir bereits hier[0] und Uwe und ich werden eine Motorsteuerung aus Aliexpressteilen bauen, mit der wir Satelliten verfolgen und damit kommunizieren wollen. Wir laden euch ein dabei mitzumachen!
Dazu passend werden wir ESA’s European Spacetalks[0] nach Jena holen und kurze Vorträge über Raumfahrt halten.
Spacetalks sind so: „We are all concerned by space activities because they make a difference to our lives on a daily basis and correspond to one of humanity’s greatest challenges. In November 2018, members of the European Space family will be sharing their passion in a series of talks presenting a vast array of space-related topics.“Zur zeit sind es Europaweit 170 Talks, und wir sind dabei. Ihr seht also, jeder kann, soll und darf da mitmachen!

„FunkWoche 2018/2 und ESA’s European Spacetalks – Raumfahrt und noch mehr Funk (19.-24.11.2018 ab 19:00 Uhr, im Hackspace Jena e.V.)“ weiterlesen

NASA SpaceApps 2018: PlaNS

Hi, we are team PlaNS.

We worked on the Planetary Navigation and Sensor System.

There is no GPS around Mars, so rovers, sensors and even astronauts need to be located differently.

Our PlaNS will solve this problem with a ground based positioning system. During normal data transmission from the sensor on the rover, or inside the Astronauts space suits, the PlaNS connects to it and constantly tracks the rover and determines its position inside the habitat.

So the rover can get lost in a crater and losing connection to the habitat, but the last location is known, so the rover can be recovered and also no Astronaut like Mark Watney will be left on Mars again.

Nothing and no one will be left behind on any planet with our PlaNS, even today

Find us on https://twitter.com/PlanetaryNaS

Work with us on https://github.com/aerospaceresearch/Planetary-Nav…

We support the MIT open-source license!

Mission Statement

Localizing and never loosing any sensor, rover and Astronaut on Mars without a GPS! PlaNS shall create a hybrid data and localizing sensor network, and also serve as a personal tracking aid for astronauts during extra base activities.

The Problem

During the current phase of Mars exploration it is difficult to position rovers and other assets on Mars because there are no Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) like GPS, Galileo, Glonass or Beidou in Martian Orbits and thus all rovers must rely on inertial measurement units (IMUs) for their relative position. Over time, the measured position can deviate from the real position and summing up over a long time. This poses a possible danger when the rover can drive into a creater because it calculated its position still outside the crater.

Now imagine Astronauts on Mars losing a team mate because they don’t know his/her last position! There is currently no other GNSS like system on Mars and the installation of a 12+ satellite system offering a global positioning system for Mars won’t take place during the first exploration phases due to budgiting and infrastructure reasons.


The Solution

Our solution includes a scalable approach based on a mobile antenna array system that is synchronized via a central time source from the base habitat (via wires or wireless) and localizing the position of any signal by its nominal and permanent transmission to the antennas.

The antenna system will grow with its tasks. It will start with 5-6 antennas near the first landing site’s habitat and can be place within walking distance and then to nearby elevated landmarks like mountains or crater rims. With each new habitat module, the antenna grid is expanded and the coverage zone of sensor data transmission and positioning will be expanded.

Even with a Martian GPS at one point, the PlaNS system can serve as an additional or redundant terrestrial communication and localisation system.

The Technical Approach

Our system can be realized by current, state of the art technologies. We decided for a rapid prototype appraoch by using Software Defined Radio receiver sticks serving as receivers at each antenna array’s groundstation and using two transmitters on ISM and PWM bands simulating the sensors and Astronauts transceivers.

Our appraoch also includes timesynching on the same transmitting channel as the sensors and Astronauts. Due to the fact that the relative positions of the antenna array ground stations and also the position of the central time synching transmitter are known, one time synching pulse can be used at all stations for synching their local system times. With this, a Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) can be achieved with each incoming signal from sensors and Astronauts.

Future

Only the sampling rate of the receivers will limit the accuracy of the system. With our „cheap“ demonstrators, samplingrate is 2MHz and thus the distance the electro-magnetic wave is travelling will be about 150 meters. Our system will give rough directions but for less than 50€ per ground station. More suffisticated SDR receivers like HackRF or LimeSDR will improve the accuracy.

The team decided to keep on working on PlaNS because it is also relevant for further Planets and Moons, but mainly on Earth. A mobile search and rescue system for hikers in areas with deep valleys blocking the GNSS reception will speed up the localization, bringing the rescue team earlier to the accident area and thus saving lifes!

Status

We are currently working on the analysis of our measuring test during the Space Apps 2018 Hackathon.

The PlaNS system is part of the Distributed Ground Station Network (DGSN) where a similar approach is used to track cubesats and other satellites in orbit. So PlaNS is a natural extension of DGSN and will be worked on with the community and also during future Google Summer of Code campaigns.